Shelli Johnson

Shelli Johnson

Shelli Johnson – @YellowstoneShel

I found Shelli (@yellowstoneshel) online a few months ago and exchange a few tweets with her over time.  I saw her post in May recounting her Rim-to-Rim-to-Rim trek in the Grand Canyon and immediately knew that she is someone that I wanted to get to know better.

So I reached out to her begging for an opportunity to interview for our #hike2020 series.  It was a very easy sell as Shelli is clearly a sharing and open person.  You find that from almost everyone you meet in Wyoming.  I know, because I married a Wyoming cowgirl!  The best thing about Shelli is her clear love for Wyoming, the Wind River Range, and for hiking in general.  This interview will give you lots of tips for planning any big hike and certainly for trying to tackle a R2R or a R2R2R in the Grand Canyon.

This Twitterview was conducted between Tim Miner (@TrailSherpa) and Shelli Johnson (@yellowstoneshel) via Twitter on Friday, August 27, 2010 and is part of the Trail Sherpa Blog Series #hike2020.

TrailSherpa: Today’s interview is with Shelli Johnson aka @YellowstoneShel about her recent Rim-to-Rim-to-Rim challenge at the Grand Canyon.

Trailsherpa: Good morning Shelli! Thanks for taking time to chat with me about this adventure. Let’s start with some background.

TrailSherpa: How long have you been hiking and how did you get started?

YellowstoneShel:   Sorry, can’t see your ques on Tweetchat. I’ve been (seriously) hiking since late 1988 or so…

YellowstoneShel:   Went 2 college at Univ of Montana on a basketball scholarship. I grew interested in hiking given all of Missoula’s scenery.

YellowstoneShel:   Would often hike what we called “The M”,or Mt. Sentinel, which had a M on it. It was a grunt. First real taste of uphill hiking.

YellowstoneShel:   Really got serious — about serious hiking — in 1995 when I moved back to my hometown of Lander, WY…

YellowstoneShel:   My husband, Jerry, & I climbed Wind River Peak in 1996 & Lizard Head Peak in 1998. Both here in the Wind Rivers. Got the bug…

YellowstoneShel:   I love anything outdoors, but long-distance hiking, in stunning scenery, is my foremost outdoors passion…

YellowstoneShel:   We have 3 young sons so I prefer to cover a ton of ground in a short amount of time, then I’m not away from them for long…

YellowstoneShel:   That said, we do lots of family hikes, which I adore, as well.

YellowstoneShel:   There’s a little backstory. :>

TrailSherpa: You live in Lander, WY and spend much of your trail time in the Wind River Range. What appeals to you most about the area?

YellowstoneShel:   Oh, let me list all the ways my beloved Wind River Mountains appeal to me…

YellowstoneShel:   For starters, the range is absolutely spectacular. Jaw-dropping scenery. The Range is 100 miles long…

YellowstoneShel:   Its crest follows the Continental Divide. I’m on the east side, in Lander, WY. About 20 miles in to reach the peaks…

YellowstoneShel:   About 40 peaks that are taller than 13,000′. Full of glaciers, including about 156 on the east side…

YellowstoneShel:   320 days of sunshine here in Wyoming. Unpopulated. Only 550,000 people in our entire state! This means UNCROWDED trails…

YellowstoneShel:   Scenery is as stunning as Yosemite but w/one big difference: you feel like you have it to yourself…

YellowstoneShel:   Vehicle- & small building-sized granite chunks scatter alpine tundra that is full of small wildflowers of all colors…

YellowstoneShel:   I’m not going 2 lie.I smile when I’m in the Winds & recall people’s reaction when I say I’m from Wyo. Many think it’s ugly here…

YellowstoneShel:   They think we are just sagebrush and open space and that we still use covered wagons to get places. This is fine w/me : > …

YellowstoneShel:   Cirque of Towers is world-famous. Can’t imagine how spectacular it is. In July I’ll see maybe 10 people on the trail there…

YellowstoneShel:   Sorry to be long-winded, but as I said, I LOVE the Wind Rivers. Here’s a pic from recent hike to Cirque: http://twitpic.com/2fqvyd

YellowstoneShel:   And another: http://twitpic.com/2fqw02

YellowstoneShel:   And sorry, just one more: http://twitpic.com/2fn85u

YellowstoneShel:   That’s probably enough. Already letting too much of the secret out! : >

TrailSherpa: Do you have a crew that you normally hike with? Other than your family?

YellowstoneShel:  Oh yeah. But it’s not easy to find people in my small town who want to hike for 20-32 miles IN 1 DAY…

YellowstoneShel:  When I ask someone I often get the response: “Well, er, yes, if we can do take, like, 3 days?” …

YellowstoneShel:  Seriously. I’m in Lander, home of the National Outdoor Leadership School. (NOLS). I’m probably an “average” athlete here…

YellowstoneShel:  So there are many fit people with whom to hike. I have about 5-10 close girlfriends. Usually I can rope 1-4 of them into a hike…

YellowstoneShel:  My husband, Jerry, is a great hiking companion, who often joins me. But I started an informal women’s hiking group…WRAN…

YellowstoneShel:  WRAN stands for Wind River Awesome Nannies (goats). We hike fast & hard, r inspired by the sights & the camaraderie…

YellowstoneShel:  The criteria, if there are any, are: must be positive & in good shape. On these hikes we talk a lot, but there’s also solitude..

YellowstoneShel:  I like long hikes for the solitude, too, even if I’m sharing the trail w/good friends…

YellowstoneShel:  Many wonder why I would hike so far in a single day. No doubt it’s about the physical challenge. The scenery is icing on the cake.

YellowstoneShel:  I like to push my body — and more importantly my mind — to see what I can do. And to reflect on all that I see in a single day.

YellowstoneShel:  Call me crazy, but I live for this. And then, as I said earlier, I’m not away from my family but for a day.

TrailSherpa: Anyone that reads your blog knows that you take exercise seriously. How often do you get out on the trail?

YellowstoneShel:  As often as possible! We had a generous winter so got a late start in the high country this summer…

YellowstoneShel:  Typically during the summer, I do 1-2 short power hikes during the week and one biggie per week. I also do other training…

YellowstoneShel:  During the winter, I skate ski. I work with a personal trainer. I do lots of high intensity strength & power conditioning…

YellowstoneShel:  Everything I do for exercise is intended to help me with uphills & endurance…

YellowstoneShel:  There’s a hill, Fairfield Hill, about 8 minutes from town, that is ugly in the sense it’s loose & rubbly. It’s an ATV trail…

YellowstoneShel:  But it’s got just the grade I need to train hard for arduous hikes. It’s about 1,500′ in 1.3 miles. It’s a gr8 lungbuster…

YellowstoneShel:  I also do lots of short and fun hikes with Jerry our sons, who are ages 10, 8 and 3. We hike 1-4 miles. Love that as well.

YellowstoneShel:  Eating right is important too.It’s true the saying to treat your body like a temple.Garbage in, garbage out.Eating right helps…

YellowstoneShel:  I live for these long distance hikes ea yr so I do everything possible to improve those experiences…

YellowstoneShel:  Not sure if this covers your ques. about exercise & trail hiking frequency… Let me know if you want more re. exercise…

YellowstoneShel:  Sorry to ramble re. the exercise. I do want to say that the athletic benefit is of course one motivation…

YellowstoneShel:  But I actually think the mental benefits I gain from these long, inspiring hikes is more significant than the physical! …

YellowstoneShel:  For weeks after one long hike I’m inspired by the sights that I saw, the conversations I had w/friends & the accomplishment.

YellowstoneShel:  That’s the biggest reason I keep going back for more. Okay, that’s it for exercise. Sorry to ramble. : >

TrailSherpa: You’ve been a busy girl this summer. Can you list some of your epic adventures you crossed off your life list.

YellowstoneShel:   I climbed the Grand Teton in Aug 2009. (http://adjix.com/8nwa) That was a biggie for me…

YellowstoneShel:  I’ve done about 10 hikes combined here in my beloved Wind River Range during this summer & last that were “epic”…

YellowstoneShel:   I did the Grand Canyon Rim-to-Rim-to-Rim this past May. In under 24 hours. That was a major life list item for me!…

YellowstoneShel:  I also had a strong coffee this morning. An important ongoing life list item, I might add. : >…

YellowstoneShel:  If interested, my Grand Canyon Rim-to-Rim-to-Rim blog post is here: http://adjix.com/zd3k

YellowstoneShel:  Re. epic adventures this year. I just completed a 32-mile day hike in the Wind Rivers. Was huge for me… Coveted…

YellowstoneShel:  Big Sandy over Jackass Pass, Lizard Head Meadows, North Fork, Pinto Park, Middle Fork and out Sinks Canyon. Epic & Stunning!

YellowstoneShel:  If interested, here’s a blog post about the 32-miler here in the Winds I did on Aug. 16: http://adjix.com/4myz

TrailSherpa: In May, you did the Rim-to-Rim-to-Rim of the Grand Canyon in under 24 hours. What were you thinking?!?

YellowstoneShel:  Well, good question. At mile 41, I was thinking: “Whose idea was this??! This was a choice??!!”… LOL

YellowstoneShel:  I had hiked South Kaibab to Phantom Ranch & up Bright Angel as a day hike on 2 occasions. That whet my appetite for the R2R2R…

YellowstoneShel:  I was training for it but didn’t have it on the calendar. Wasn’t sure when it would come to fruition but wanted to be ready…

YellowstoneShel:  So was in a gr8 shape when a colleague/friend of mine, Jonathan Dorn, editor of Backpacker Mag, invited me to do the R2R2R…

YellowstoneShel:  I jumped at it! 5 days later, I was driving to GC, excited as all get out for the opportunity…

YellowstoneShel:  Rim-to-Rim-to-Rim was top of the life list for me at the time. So I was in!

TrailSherpa: What were the total stats for that hike?

YellowstoneShel:  15 energy bars, 8 gu’s, 8 Clif shot bloks, 1 5-hr Energy, 1 Slim Jim, 18 pretzels…

YellowstoneShel:  But I’m getting ahead of myself. Sorry. 23,000 feet of elevation gain/loss 46 miles, 23 hours…Oh, and about 25 blisters…

YellowstoneShel:  The hike was to be 45 miles. And that’s what I had trained for. LOL. But Jon’s Garmin reported 46 miles. Who r we to argue?…

YellowstoneShel:  Jon Dorn is an adventure racer & phenomenal endurance athlete. I knew I was in good hands, when he invited me.

YellowstoneShel:  My husband, Jerry, is an animal–more than I am– but I think he was relieved when I got an invite. He didn’t have to do it then!

TrailSherpa: Did you do anything special to prepare for the R2R2R?

YellowstoneShel:  I don’t want to be too redundant…:> I skate skied, a lot, during the winter, which is a high intensity, powerful sport…

YellowstoneShel:  I do 2 super hard sessions with a trainer every week, including a metabolic workout, aka “suffering”, & a strength…

YellowstoneShel:  Then I do cardio 3x a week during the off-season. Big focus on my core and my legs. These 2 “areas” take the biggest beating…

YellowstoneShel:  So far it’s paid off, big-time.@ any time I can consider most adventures that come up. I do hard intervals on the Elliptical too.

YellowstoneShel:  Stepmill & Elliptical & uphill hiking. Also TIME ON MY FEET. This was great training for the RimtoRimtoRim…

YellowstoneShel:  However, (obviously), I didn’t go out for a 23-hour training session. Nothing close to that. 6 hrs I think was tops.

YellowstoneShel:  That’s about it for preparation. : >

YellowstoneShel:  One thing to add, though, no question these long “epic” day hikes in my local mountains helped prepare me for the R2R2R.

TrailSherpa: Any special gear or gadgets specifically for the R2R2R?

YellowstoneShel:  Collapsible trekking poles, Spot Messenger (for Jerry & boys to track my progress) + Camera + Flip Video+Daypack/Hydration Pack

YellowstoneShel:  Oh and let me not forget the critical headlamp!

YellowstoneShel:  I use a Nikon Coolpix 6000 (geotagging) camera, an Olympus Stylus “bombproof” 1030 camera & a Flip Mino HD.

YellowstoneShel:  And a Slim Jim, which I would consider “essential gear.” That’s it for “special gear or gadgets.” : >

TrailSherpa: Meat always makes it into these interviews. @TheSoCalHiker mentions it in his interview too! Essential!

YellowstoneShel:  The meat was good, but it was the TON of salt packed into the Slim Jim that hit the spot.Got chapped lips upon snarfing it.LOL

TrailSherpa: This was your first experience with night hiking wasn’t it? What can you share with others about that?

YellowstoneShel:  Yes it was. And I’m the opposite of a night owl, I tell you that. So I was a little nervous–yet excited–for the night hiking…

YellowstoneShel:  We started hiking at 2 pm. Which meant we would be on the North Rim, ascending & descending it during night…

YellowstoneShel:  It was amazing! I had “blistered feet” challenges, so looking forward to “change of scenery” (night hiking) propelled me…

YellowstoneShel:  I think it was brilliant to ascend the North Rim during night. That way we couldn’t see the gazillion switchbacks above us…

YellowstoneShel:  But what an adventure! Bats fluttered about us and scorpions were on the trail! Lots of them! Talk about freak out… : >

YellowstoneShel:   Before I forget, here’s a scorpion photo from the night hiking! http://twitpic.com/2ic5b4

YellowstoneShel:  So, plenty of things to keep it interesting during the night. Bats, scorpions–not to mention …

YellowstoneShel:  The overwhelming presence of the great abyss that is the Grand Canyon to my immediate right. Couldn’t see it but could feel it…

YellowstoneShel:  Made a mental note to myself: “Do not fall asleep here.”This was for miles. The trail skirted the edge of the great, dark abyss…

YellowstoneShel:  Amazing adventure, though. Watching scorpions scurry on the trail before me. Bats whizzing by. Brilliant stars filling the sky…

YellowstoneShel:  The moon was just a sliver but made Roaring Springs’ waterfall glow in the dark. The falls were effervescent…Magical, really.

TrailSherpa: Can you share your greatest moment on the hike? Any ah-ha moment?

YellowstoneShel:  Greatest moment? There were many. Probably Roaring Springs under a starry/black sky lit up by only a sliver of the moon…

YellowstoneShel:  That was truly magical, including the “roaring” that Roaring Springs provided for a soundtrack for quite some time…

YellowstoneShel:  The people I met along the trail. The small but meaningful conversations I shared with Jon, & total strangers. A kinship…

YellowstoneShel:  The sights of the Grand Canyon! And of course, my last step was a highlight. : >

YellowstoneShel:  As far as an a-ha moment. There are times during a hike like this when it becomes a “march” of sorts. You find inspiration…

YellowstoneShel:  in small things like a frog I hear, a butterfly. Or in thinking of people who are disabled or sick, unable to do these things…

YellowstoneShel:  Many times I was overwhelmed with emotion — happy tears I call ’em. I realize how lucky I am. Grateful for the love of my family.

YellowstoneShel:  My husband & sons, and all of my family. My friends. All of those who are supportive & helped make the adventure real for me…

YellowstoneShel:  That about sums up the greatest moments.

YellowstoneShel:  Re. greatest moments…Throughout the entire hike, the sights are jaw dropping. Inspiring sights provide a buffer for the work.

YellowstoneShel:   Also, a pic of Jon & I @ North Rim. Arrived right b4 midnight, 9.5 hrs after our start. 1/2-way done! http://twitpic.com/2ic7or

TrailSherpa: What about your darkest? Any moments of monumental fear or doubt that you had to overcome?

YellowstoneShel:  I definitely can recall what was the darkest moment of the entire adventure & it came early. @ mile 8, I had 2 big blisters…

YellowstoneShel:  I expected to blisters to be an issue but certainly not so early & definitely not to the extent that I would have…

YellowstoneShel:  My feet were TOTALLY covered by blisters by the time I reached the North Rim. Here’s a pic: http://twitpic.com/2ic3gd

YellowstoneShel:  But let me return to the “darkest” moment of the hike. At mile 6 I felt 2 hot spots. I treated them… applied lube & duct tape…

YellowstoneShel:  By mile 8, both exploded.Felt ’em pop. In terrible locations for this early on: 1 on right ball of foot, 1 on inside of big toe…

YellowstoneShel:  Inside I was struggling, big-time, about the situation. This was not something I expected by mile 8…

YellowstoneShel:  I am a spiritual person. I wanted 2 curse God–or anyone & say what I was feeling, which was: “So This is How It’s Going to Be?”..

YellowstoneShel:  I knew this was going to be an extremely difficult journey, the R2R2R. I didn’t need it to be any more difficult…

YellowstoneShel:  At mile 8, I told Jon we needed to stop & I needed to address my foot again. He saw the blisters…

YellowstoneShel:  He basically said, “We have 35 more miles to go. There r no services on the North Rim… We can turn back now…

YellowstoneShel:  He said, “I’ll give u a pass. Those r some bad blisters. I’m not sure I could hike through those.” This was my darkest moment…

YellowstoneShel:  Something about hearing Jon say this. He’s a animal, remember. He was acknowledging the bad news of my feet. Hearing that…

YellowstoneShel:  Well, let’s just say it was demoralizing. When he acknowledged my blisters (only 2 at that point!), it was like they became real..

YellowstoneShel:  But honestly, I weighed turning around & “quitting” vs. completing this adventure-of-a-lifetime, life list experience, & …

YellowstoneShel:  I was 100% clear I wanted/needed to continue. But it was also very clear to me what I was signing onto at that moment was…

YellowstoneShel:  way more difficult than what I had embarked upon when I accepted Jon’s invite & started down the trail only a few hours earlier.

YellowstoneShel:  So, that there was a super dark moment for me. The whole adventure changed. I needed to dig deeper than ever b4…

YellowstoneShel:  to somehow tap into/find the consitution within myself that would enable me to endure what was going to be tougher than planned…

YellowstoneShel:  Not sure I’m doing this dark moment justice in my explanation here…It’s hard to put into words…

YellowstoneShel:  But suffice it to say that between mile 8 & mile 25, several more blisters formed, popped, etc…

YellowstoneShel:  All the damage was done by the time we reached the North Rim. So much so that after that I never removed my shoes…

YellowstoneShel:  Somehow, some way I still very much enjoyed the adventure…

YellowstoneShel:  The night hiking helped provide an exciting distraction from the pain I felt with each step..My ascent of the North Rim was quick.

YellowstoneShel:  I moved quickly up the North Rim. Believe it or not it was gr8 2 b going uphill. It changed the way my feet hit the ground…

YellowstoneShel:  But from the North Rim… w/halfway still to go, and much of it steep, unrelenting (sliding) downhill, the hike became a march…

YellowstoneShel:  So although the R2R2R was probably 50 times harder for me due to the pain with each of the gazillion steps I took…

YellowstoneShel:  The single, darkest moment was the realization @ mile 8 that the circumstances of my adventure were going to be more difficult…

YellowstoneShel:  Sorry to ramble. Don’t want the blistered feet 2 steal the thunder from what was an adventure of a lifetime.But was a reality.

YellowstoneShel:  That’s the darkest moment. :<

TrailSherpa: I would say so.  Hiking on blisters for 25 miles is a deal breaker for most people.

YellowstoneShel:  I think it was 35 miles. Just to clarify!!! : >

TrailSherpa: Which do you think was more taxing on your body – the distance or the elevation gain/loss?

YellowstoneShel:  Well, to be honest, I felt I had the fitness for it. I would never want to downplay the fitness required for such an epic hike…

YellowstoneShel:  but the fitness, I had. I must have put in the work & the time because fitness-wise, I felt pretty strong to the end…

YellowstoneShel:  Elevation gain & loss, well, were significant. But again, I’m used to steep & rugged uphills/downhills in the Wind Rivers here…

YellowstoneShel:  I would say, by far, the 2 most challenging aspects of the hike (not inc. the blisters!), were the heat & nature of the trail…

YellowstoneShel:  It was 103 degrees midway down the S. Kaibab. I’m certain it played a role in my blisters.My feet were hot & sweatier than normal.

YellowstoneShel:  But most importantly, for me, it’s the fact that in the Grand Canyon, you start with the downhill first. This is hard for me!…

YellowstoneShel:  Don’t get me wrong. I love downhills. I’m used to downhills. But almost always they come after the uphills…

YellowstoneShel:  So, literally, but also metaphorically, I prefer going uphill first. I would prefer to work first, then coast…

YellowstoneShel:  But, given the fact that the Grand Canyon is a great abyss, it’s sorta hard to get around that fact, isn’t it? So, that’s tough…

YellowstoneShel:  To most, the elevation gain/loss is/should be considered significant. Fitness level should be very high. But for me…

YellowstoneShel:  The high/hot temperatures starting out, combined with downhill hiking first, then uphill, were biggest challenge for me…

YellowstoneShel:  Hope this all makes sense. : > That sums up the answer to your question I think.

YellowstoneShel:  I will add that the distance, for even the most fit, does wear on you. It’s inevitable. For me, it’s time on my feet. It’s tough..

YellowstoneShel:  Anyone who’s on their feet, up and down in hot, rugged conditions, for almost 24 hours, will likely have tired feet & legs. Right?

YellowstoneShel:  Here’s a pic of me almost to Phantom Ranch for the 2nd time. U can’t see the pain, but I was feeling it: http://twitpic.com/2ic77t

YellowstoneShel:  Views like this one, on my way back (Up Bright Angel on South Rim) confirms how far the trek was: http://twitpic.com/2ic6fu

TrailSherpa: If you decided to tackle this one again, would you do anything differently?

YellowstoneShel:  Again? Are you kidding me? hahaha LOL. Just kidding…

YellowstoneShel:  A good friend emailed me before I was even out of Arizona, asking me if I’d do it again, w/her, in 2011…

YellowstoneShel:  In my mind, I was thinking, “at least give me one month to forget the pain…” But seriously, I’m not sure I would do it again…

YellowstoneShel:  Life is short & there is so many areas I want to see. I tend to look @ these things as once-in-a-lifetime opportunities…

YellowstoneShel:  That said, I LOVE the Grand Canyon. But I think I would prefer to experience new places when I do these epic adventures…

YellowstoneShel:  If I were to do it again, though, the tough call would be when to depart. I always start everything early, before or at sunrise…

YellowstoneShel:  It’s counterintuitive & uncomfortable for me to start any other time. However, I do think our schedule was brilliant in many ways.

YellowstoneShel:  Starting at 2 pm meant we got to experience the most difficult part (North Rim ascent/descent) in the dark…

YellowstoneShel:  It was cooler… way cooler hiking up the North Rim in the dark, & we couldn’t see the countless switchbacks..

YellowstoneShel:  For these reasons I think there is good reason to do as we did: Start after lunch and finish at lunch…

YellowstoneShel:  But since you asked, that would be the only major thing I would probably consider if ever I were to do it again…

TrailSherpa: It’s hard to beat such an epic trek, but I am sure you have some ideas. What’s next on the life list?

YellowstoneShel:  That is a great question, Tim. I am scheming right now on what the next big epic trek will be…

YellowstoneShel:  I have enough local Wind River treks to keep me happy & occupied for many summers. I want to be here in the summers…

YellowstoneShel:  But I would like to do 1-2 epic treks elsewhere every year. For sure, 1 every spring in a new place. Possibly also 1 in the Fall.

YellowstoneShel:  Any ideas? I would like to find a 32- to 45-miler epic trek to do in one push for next May. I’m open to ideas!…

TrailSherpa: Multiple peak hikes would be my first thought. Something involving My Whitney might fit the bill.

YellowstoneShel:  Sounds good. Am excited to read @SoCalHiker’s JMT story w/u for that reason.

YellowstoneShel:  I do prefer mountains. ‘Good views come to those who hike uphill’ is sorta my motto. :>

YellowstoneShel:  We have some family trekking goals but those will come when our boys are a little older. Trekking in the Himalayas, etc…

YellowstoneShel:  Before I forget, here’s a pic of about 1 mile from the finish of my R2R2R.(Sorta leaning on the poles!) http://twitpic.com/1q6klm

YellowstoneShel:  Maybe the “most epic trek” in each of the 50 states. I would generate ideas from popular vote to determine these.

YellowstoneShel:  And consult places like TrailSherpa.com and your interviews for ideas of course. I appreciate your great blog as a resource.

TrailSherpa: Thanks for taking time today to share your R2R2R story with us. Where can people follow your adventures online?

YellowstoneShel:  Thank you, Tim! I appreci8 the opportunity to relive the R2R2R & to talk about the Wind Rivers & my passion for hiking. Thank you!

YellowstoneShel:  Hey, if it’s okay, wanted to include a family hiking photo, too: http://twitpic.com/2icqkn

YellowstoneShel:  I blog about all of my hiking adventures on HaveMediaWillTravel.com

YellowstoneShel:  Thank you so much. I am a lucky girl, I know it, to have a husband & sons who support me. Thanks again!

You can get more detail of Shelli’s Rim-to-Rim-to-Rim on her blog or on Jon Dorn’s blog.

This Twitterview was conducted between Tim Miner (@TrailSherpa) and Shelli Johnson (@yellowstoneshel) via Twitter on Friday, August 27, 2010 and is part of the Trail Sherpa Blog Series #hike2020.

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I'm the founder of Vestor Logic, the digital strategy and web design firm that created Trail Sherpa, ParksFolio, and Modern Steader. I'm a day hiker, top chef in camp, doting husband, and father to two headlamp wearing boys. My work in digital media brings those experiences to life.